Month: September 2006

Walt Disney Concert Hall at night

Walt Disney Concert Hall at night

Los Angeles, California. While downtown to see Doubt I strolled down the block to see Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, home of the LA Philharmonic. The night lighting on the stainless steel skin of this amazing building was striking but there still wasn’t a lot of light for handheld photography. I shot anyway and figured I’d get nothing but this image, while not all that sharp gives you a good sense of the drama of the building.

Doubt at the Los Angeles Music Center

Doubt at the Los Angeles Music Center

Los Angeles, California. Last night my mother and I went to see Doubt at the Ahmanson Theater at the LA Music Center. She can’t drive at night or on the freeway anymore (she’s 91) so she hadn’t been to the Music Center in a while.

We got there early and the entire plaza that houses the three theaters was alive with people eating, drinking, and dancing to big band music. The weather was great and the light was fantastic.

Just to orient those of you who have not been to this place, ahead of me is the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion where the LA Opera performs. The round building I’m standing next to is the Mark Taper Forum, a small, intimate theater (Doubt would be been better in this smaller venue) and behind me, out of view is the Ahmanson Theater, a relatively large theater where we saw Doubt.

My mother pushed my wife and me to go see Doubt in New York but we never made the time (and tickets were hard to get). So, she took matters into her own hands and pulled/pushed me to go on this visit and I’m delighted that she did. Doubt is, without a doubt, one of the best plays I’ve seen in my life (I’ve seen many and I’m not young). It is superb in every possible way. The playwright, John Patrick Shanley has written the most amazing script (he wrote the screenplay for Moonstruck, one of my favorite movies among other plays and screenplays), and the cast is incredible. Cherry Jones, Chris McGarry, Lisa Joyce, and Adriane Lenox are all outstanding. This play and its actors have received numerous awards and they are well deserved. The staging, the lighting, the entire experience was first rate.

For those of you who don’t do much theater, I must tell you, there is nothing like live performance. I’m a movie-a-holic but theater is different and when you combine a script like Doubt and actors like these you’re in for a mind-blow beyond words.

Perpetual Sunset

Perpetual Sunset

Above The Great Lakes. The great thing about taking off from the east coast at 5:30 pm and flying west is that you’re flying into the sunset which means you get to follow it for a while. Here we’re flying at 38,000 feet and there are numerous layers of clouds, each different and each showing the sunset in different ways.

Tomatoes in Colander

Tomatoes in Colander

Warren, Connecticut. After a summer of rain and odd weather where we thought our garden would be a failure it is now pumping out tomatoes of all kinds daily. There are only so many fresh tomatoes we want to eat so when we’re overrun we peel them and cook them down into sauce and freeze it. There’s nothing better to bring back a thought of summer in the depths of winter than the smell and taste of fresh frozen tomato sauce on pasta.

Sunrise in the Valley

Sunrise in the Valley

Warren, Connecticut. Most clear mornings the corn field across the road, which is now completely harvested, creates ground fog which slowly burns off as the sun comes up and warms the air. By the time I got dressed and ran across the road with camera and tripod it was almost too late and I was bummed. However, even though the bulk of the fog had burned off by the time I shot this there was still enough in the far “wrinkles” of the valley to make things interesting.

Canon 5D, Canon 24-70 f/2.8 L at 67mm, ISO 100, f/11.3 at 1/100th of a second. Tripod. Sepia.

Our place

Our place

Warren, Connecticut. A few paces up the road from the last shot you come across our little place. L-R: wood splitting area, vegetable garden surrounded by fruit trees, saltbox garage with kayaks on racks in the back, saltbox house. Behind all of this is a stream running from right to left and after crossing the stream one comes to our pond, or, better put, our swamp fed by the stream. Our property goes another few acres up the hill behind the pond, all rocky woods and of no use to anyone but raccoons and bobcats.

Forest Primeval

Forest Primeval

Warren, Connecticut. It’s heavily overcast and wet today and walking down our road, just before our house the forest is dense with heavy underbrush, small trees, vines, and larger trunks. This stretch of woods looks and actually is so impenetrable that I might as well be deep in the Amazon jungle.

Leavenworth Jackson Open Studio

Leavenworth Jackson Open StudioMy good friend Leavenworth Jackson, one of the most well-known rubber stamp artists and designers in the world, is having an open studio next month in Berkeley, California.

Her stamps are some of the most interesting and beautiful around and if you’re in the area I highly recommend dropping by.

You can download her current catalog in pdf format here to get a better idea of her stamps.

I met Leavenworth through the mail art movement in about 1979 and started buying stamps from her. We met for the first time at the San Francisco Macworld in 1985 (I helped her buy her first Mac to run her stamp business).

Leavenworth came east for a visit this past summer at the same time that Gary Sharp was visiting us so we all had a grand reunion in New York and up here in Connecticut. Gary had never met her but had been buying her stamps for 20 years and this was only the third time I’d met her. My wife Anne and LJ enjoyed each other immensely as well. She’s an exceptional person in every way, an incredibly talented artist and someone I’m proud to call a friend. If you can get to this open studio, don’t miss it.

Grass Gone to Seed

Grass Gone to Seed

Warren, Connecticut. I was trying to shoot squash tendrils in our vegetable garden and was having no luck so turned my attention to some grass that had grown unchecked between the squash runners. Even something as common as grass gone to seed, when lit right, can be interesting, to me anyway.

What is the worth of words?

Michael Rogers, a columnist for MSNBC takes a look at how technology is affecting literacy in What is the worth of words? Will it matter if people can’t read in the future?

This may not be the definitive thinking on this subject but it’s a fascinating subject and worth thinking about. I can say without a doubt that RSS alone, while allowing me to scan more information seems to run counter to my ability to go really deep. We’re not even talking about assistive technologies like text to speech which is getting quite good. Things are definitely changing.

Cosmos Bud or Martian Lander

Cosmos Bud or Martian Lander

Warren, Connecticut. This bud contains a group of spectacular purple petals and the stamen sex organs of the cosmos flower and will open into something much larger than itself. Somehow this reminds me of the recent martian landers that land as a small pod and then unfold into complex machines with solar “petals.”

Moo: Flickr MiniCards

Moo is a printing service linked to flickr that makes printing small business card size cards of flickr images easy and fun. Great UI on the site. The first ten cards are free for anyone with a flickr pro account (good hook).

Even though I can make cards easily on my own printer I’ll definitely use them a bit. My first ten are winging there way”to me. Stay tuned.

Source: David Clark

Fall on a Wall

Fall on a Wall

Washington, Connecticut. When the weather starts getting cooler flora of all types feel it and begin their seasonal change getting ready for colder weather. On this south facing rock foundation wall, the ivy is changing from green to a beautiful red while the moss will change from green to a muted brown. The ivy leaves will eventually fall off and the vines will contract and dry up a bit while the moss will pull in and hunker down for winter.