Monthly Archives: May 2007

Even Cacti Make Flowers

Even Cacti Make Flowers

Pasadena, California. The Huntington Desert Garden (informally known as the "cactus garden") is one of the largest and oldest collections of cacti and succulents in the world. This place is the garden equivalent of the bar scene in Star Wars. This particular plant was plentiful and almost every outcropping of it had these small yellow "golf tee-like" flowers popping out of the edges.

Andrew Sullivan on “Verschärfte Vernehmung” (enhanced interrogation)

Andrew Sullivan on “Verschärfte Vernehmung” (enhanced interrogation):

Critics will no doubt say I am accusing the Bush administration of being Hitler. I’m not. There is no comparison between the political system in Germany in 1937 and the U.S. in 2007. What I am reporting is a simple empirical fact: the interrogation methods approved and defended by this president are not new. Many have been used in the past. The very phrase used by the president to describe torture-that-isn’t-somehow-torture – ‘enhanced interrogation techniques’ – is a term originally coined by the Nazis. The techniques are indistinguishable. The methods were clearly understood in 1948 as war-crimes. The punishment for them was death.

(Source kottke.org.)

Cactus Silos

Cactus Silos

Pasadena, California. The Huntington Desert Garden (informally known as the "cactus garden") is one of the largest and oldest collections of cacti and succulents in the world. This place is the garden equivalent of the bar scene in Star Wars. These prickly cacti were growing out of an outcropping of volcanic rock, undoubtedly brought in from Oregon for the right backdrop for this amazing collection.

Every Good Domain Is Taken. Here’s Why.

Every Good Domain Is Taken. Here’s Why. Niall Kennedy on the apparently lucrative business of domain name squatting.

A simple site targeting wedding shoes earns Han’s business about $9,100 a year. Not bad for a $8 domain purchase and what he reports and about $7 in maintenance costs per year.

This is absolutely amazing. I urge anyone building web sites to read this article. This is not why we put Adsense on this and other sites although it sure has me drooling. Still, it’s a fascinating tale of what a bit of knowledge can do for you.

The question is, how does one feel about putting content-less sites up just to serve up ads for clicking? Or, put another way, how does one feel about putting sites up where the ads are the content?

(Source Daring Fireball Linked List.)

Digital Domain: Apple’s Lesson for Sony’s Stores: Just Connect

Digital Domain: Apple’s Lesson for Sony’s Stores: Just Connect: “Apple has made retail seem ridiculously easy. But why hasn’t the Windows side of the personal computer business figured it out?”

It’s not just the stores [stupid], it’s the gear. Apple not only has great stores, the stores hold great stuff. Sony used to have it but alas, they have it no more.

(Source NYT > Business.)

Mamen shooting the Housatonic

Mamen shooting the Housatonic

Bull’s Bridge, Connecticut. Bull’s Bridge* (behind Mamen) is one of the oldest covered bridges in Connecticut and the Housatonic River, which runs under it drops in a series of falls and rapids that Mamen is "shooting" here.

We’d driven by this spot on our way to the Metro North train to New York and decided to return there to see if we could find a photo or two. It was a bit bright for shots like this so we didn’t do well but it was fun anyway, just being out with a good friend.

*The wonderful thing about this bridge, for me, is that in the 1930s my father used to hitch hike up Rt. 22 from New York and walk across this bridge on his way to various waiter jobs in camps and lodges tucked into the lakes in Connecticut near where I now live. Later, when I used to drive him across Bull’s bridge he’d start into one of many long stories about all the girlfriends… never mind.

Housatonic waterfall

This is what Mamen was shooting.

Richard

And… she shot me shooting the waterfalls.

Mamen, Scott and Me

Mamen, Scott and Me

Warren, Connecticut. A few weeks ago my good friend Mamen (left) came to visit and we had a great time. After we dropped by Mecca (B&H Photo) in New York, she decided that the Canon EF 70-200 f/4 IS L was the lens for her. It just so happened that Scott, one of our UPS drivers who lives in our town had bought that lens for his 20D. I invited Scott over and while he used my EF 24-70 f/2.8 L on his 20D, Mamen used his 70-200 and I got to use her 16-35 f/2.8 L on my 5D for this shot. It was a fun time and between us we had a nice collection of lenses and cameras. I was hoping Mamen would forget about the 16-35 because I fell in love with the lens but alas, she took it with her.

Many more images of her visit to come, I’ve been very busy so no time for flickr lately.

Ceiling Height Can Affect How A Person Thinks, Feels And Acts

Ceiling Height Can Affect How A Person Thinks, Feels And Acts

For years contractors, real estate agents and event planners have said that whether building, buying or planning an event, a higher or vaulted ceiling is always better. Are they right? Until now there has been no real evidence that ceiling height has any influence or advantage with consumers. But recent research by Joan Meyers-Levy, a professor of marketing at the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management, suggests that the way people think and act is affected by ceiling height.

Wow, this is useful and makes great sense.

(Source kottke.org.)