Month: November 2011

iPhone volume/shutter button

Use Your iPhone’s Headset to Take Pictures From Afar

iOS 5 brought us the ability to use the “up” volume button on an iPhone to take a picture but I just read in lifehacker that you can use the iPhone’s earbud remote volume control to do the same thing. This will allow the propping up of the iPhone and hands-free tripping of the shutter button, essentially a cable release.

I don’t use those earbuds (can’t fit in my ears) but I think I might start carrying them now.

Susan Kare

The Sketchbook of Susan Kare, the Artist Who Gave Computing a Human Face

I first posted about Susan Kare here: Making the Macintosh Project but I’ve known about her since the mid-1980′s because both her icon and font designs were the “face” of the original Macintosh and stayed with us for close to ten years.

She makes and sells limited edition prints: Susan Kare: limited edition prints and has a professional web site for her design work: Susan Kare: user interface graphics.

Museo Reina Sofía

Museo Reina Sofía from Juan Rayos on Vimeo.

Juan Rayos has made a wonderful introduction to Spain’s national art museum in Madrid. Both the video and background music are excellent. Beautifully produced. Watch full screen, very well worth it. Chock full of visual ideas and visual design beauty.

This video introduces Museo Reina Sofía, a expanded museum with various sites and locations (Sabatini Building, Nouvel Building, Palacio de Cristal and Palacio de Velázquez), experiences and audiences. Along with this idea of campus, the collection, exhibitions and public programs are shown as a new form of mediation between the audience and the Museum’s program.

PS: Now I know where Picasso’s Guernica ended up.

[via The Kid Should See This]

Collectors and collections

I have this “disease” and there’s a very fine line between hoarding lots of stuff looking for patterns and the kind of high end collecting these folks do. Each class of collecting (hooding and high end collecting) has its extremes.

What these folks do that I haven’t done yet is curate their collections; my various collections sit in boxes in the basement and at some point when I’m not looking my wife may dispose of them. The sad part is, I might not notice for a while. Matchbooks, postcards, stamps, cigar boxes, coins, political cartoons, boarding pass stubs, embossed napkins, sea shells, pasta and a lot more. Ugh.

Another form of this is scrapbooking which tends to be about personal history but can be less focused as well. I tend to collect paper ephemera so my collections are probably a hybrid of objects and scrapbooking minus the curation and scrapbook.

In a way, blogging and reblogging is a type of collecting and curating, it’s just not objects that are being curated, it’s ideas or videos about ideas (like collecting and collectors).

AssistiveTouch

Apple’s AssistiveTouch Helps the Disabled Use a Smartphone

David Pogue is pretty worked up over AssistiveTouch and I can see why. After reading his piece I just played around with it and it’s quite fantastic. Settings/General/Accessibility/AssistiveTouch.

Try it (iOS 5), it’s quite interesting.

I’m most interested to see if it might make the iPad more accessible to my 96 year old mother. I don’t think so but it would be great if Apple worked on making iOS devices more accessible to the elderly.

Voting by iPad

Voting by iPad in Oregon on Tuesday

Election workers are taking the iPads to disabled voters who might otherwise have difficulties marking their ballots, the AP wrote. These voters are able to pull up the ballot on the iPad and tap the screen to mark the candidate of their choice before printing out their completed ballot. After that, voters will send in their votes in a much more traditional way: by mail.

Apple Inc. donated five iPads to the state for the program, and Oregon shelled out about $75,000 to make the software, the AP reported. According to Secretary of State Kate Brown and the state elections director, Steve Trout, the office tested several different types of devices before settling on the iPad.

Now, how about using iPads so the rest of us can “vote different.”

[via Gary Sharp]

Joel Bukiewicz – Knife Maker

Made by Hand / No 2 The Knife Maker from Made by Hand on Vimeo.

“Buckets of blood and sweat.” (practice)

“Convergence of handmade and food” (a bit of luck but more like smarts)

This is an excellent video and Joel’s narration makes it even better. What he says about the satisfaction he derives from making things by hand is shared by many across multiple domains from splitting and stacking wood to peeling apples for pies (maybe with one of his paring knives) to making sculpture to making chairs, and more. People who make things that other people use have a very nice feedback system in that there is direct evidence of the pleasure others are getting from one’s work.

I used to collect hand made folding pocket knives (pre 9/11) and still have some nice ones but for the most part I’m content with a few well made “factory” folders for everyday use around the house and yard.

Of course, during our recent blackout, my wife and I stayed warm because I work three years ahead collecting, processing, drying, and stacking the firewood that is our main source of heat. I get real pleasure from doing that process, a similar kind to the pleasure Joel gets in seeing others use his knives in kitchens. And, I enjoy making fine art notecards out of my photography and have sold and given away thousands of them over the years. It’s fun to make these by hand.

The video is part of a series on hand made things at: Made by Hand.

[via Steve Splonskowski and Kottke]

Sophie and Liberty come across some starlings

Murmuration from Sophie Windsor Clive on Vimeo.

Sophie and Liberty run into a “murmuration” of starlings. I must disagree (which I rarely do) with my most excellent source Jason Kottke, the quality of this video is perfect: it’s what my wife and I would make if we kayaked out to an island and caught a murmuration of starlings doing their thing. Including the look of awe and wonder on Liberty’s face at the very end. In many ways, I like this better than a highly produced National Geographic video.