Monthly Archives: January 2012

Ice on the Appalachian Trail

Ice on the AT

Mt. Race, Massachusetts. All of these shots were taken in a single puddle on the Appalachian Trail on the north ridge of Mt. Race. I don’t know enough about ice crystals to understand why some puddles produce crystals and others don’t but when I find a patch of great crystals like this it’s like finding gold. The only downside is that the gloves come off and one’s hands can get cold in a long session. The day I took these was relatively mild so hands didn’t suffer and as a result, more ice shots.

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Black birches from below

Black birch from below

On Mt. Greylock, Massachusetts. Hiking down the Haley Farm Trail on the west side of Mt. Greylock we came across a dead black birch with huge mushrooms on it. Hiked out to the tree and shot straight up hoping to catch the mushrooms but instead got an interesting shot of the creepy decaying tree and the trees around it.

PressPausePlay

PressPausePlay from House of Radon on Vimeo.

The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent in an unprecedented way, with unlimited opportunities. But does democratized culture mean better art or is true talent instead drowned out? This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world’s most influential creators of the digital era.

This is an amazing film, really worth making the time (an hour and 21 minutes) to watch. It’s well thought out, well shot, well edited, and the message is nuanced, not a slam dunk for digital or against it.

[via PetaPixel]

Rail Bridge Replacement time lapse

Time Lapse – Rail Bridge Replacement, Cow Lane, Reading from Chris Wilkinson on Vimeo.

Upper Cut Productions was commissioned by BAM Nuttall and Network Rail to film a rail bridge reconstruction project in Reading, during the Christmas period of 2011.

3 weather-proofed time lapse cameras were installed in various locations to capture the progress of the new bridge construction – they took nearly 1/4million photographs over a 6 month period.

Following the short video of the bridge move between 24.12.11 and 28.12.11, this video reveals the full project from the bridge construction to the site clearance after New Year.

This is one of the best time lapse videos of anything I’ve ever seen. What an incredible construction job, building the bridge and moving it. And the fact that they used multiple cameras and wove the time lapse together so beautifully does justice to the amazing construction job. Wow.

[via wimp.com]

Trees from below

Cypress Tree from below

Huntington Library Gardens, Pasadena, California. Went on an outing with my mother today. Decided to use S100 to shoot trees from below since this place has an amazing variety of spectacular and rare trees. I’m quite pleased with the way this small camera worked; I got a nice variety of decent images.

Cypress tree from below

Cypress tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

Tree from below

David Pogue on SOPA

Put Down the Pitchforks on SOPA

Pogue lays out the situation calmly and clearly. Its worth a read.

Some people are O.K. with the goals of the bills, acknowledging that software piracy is out of control; they object only to the bills’ approaches. If the entertainment industry’s legal arm gets out of control, they say, they could deem almost anything to be a piracy site. YouTube could be one, because lots of videos include bits of TV shows and copyrighted music. Facebook could be one, because people often link to copyrighted videos and songs. Google and Bing would be responsible for removing every link to a questionable Web site. Just a gigantic headache.

But there’s another group of people with a different agenda: They don’t even agree with the bills’ purpose. They don’t want their free movies taken away. A good number of them believe that free music and movies are their natural-born rights. They don’t want the big evil government taking away their free fun.

The second group of people is the group I don’t want to be associated with. This is what clouds my support for the entire protest.

iPhone mute switch kerfuffle

Ringing Finally Ended, but There’s No Button to Stop Shame

The unmistakably jarring sound of an iPhone marimba ring interrupted the soft and spiritual final measures of Mahler’s Symphony No. 9 at the New York Philharmonic on Tuesday night. The conductor, Alan Gilbert, did something almost unheard-of in a concert hall: He stopped the performance. But the ringing kept on going, prompting increasingly angry shouts in the audience directed at the malefactor.

After words from Mr. Gilbert, and what seemed like weeks, the cellphone owner finally silenced his device. After the audience cheered, the concert resumed. Internet vitriol ensued.

Many people have been commenting on this event for a while now and Marco Arment pulls many of the various issues and sub-issues together here: Designing “Mute”.

No doubt how the mute switch works relative to all sounds is a meaningful design discussion but what interests me is that few if any of these discussions about the event recommend turning the phone off. Turning electronics off not only solves the unexpected alarm/ring problem, it also solves the problem of people silently texting their friends during a concert.

If I spend the money to go to a concert at Avery Fisher Hall the last thing I want is to be sitting next to someone with a lit up smartphone texting his or her friends.

The answer here is to turn off all electronic devices at a concert like this. Not sleep, not mute, but power down. That takes care of the texting problem and users who don’t know that they’ve set up an alarm to go off during a concert.

India Marks a Year Free of Polio

India Marks a Year Free of Polio

A polio-free India means that there are just three nations where polio is considered endemic: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria.

Incredible. As a polio survivor this is particularly meaningful to me. It’s an enormous job to do this in a huge, developing country like India and the Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization deserve praise for their hard work over many years.

Technical notes on shooting the new Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth, ASC, uses RED ONEs and EPICsto expose The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Because of its many locations and logistical demands, the 160-day shoot was broken up into several stages. The production started in Sweden shooting all the winter exteriors and a few interior sets, and then went to Zurich for two weeks to shoot the banking scenes, as well as exteriors and interiors. The team then returned to the U.S. and shot all the remaining interiors on stage at the Paramount lot and the new RED Studios for some 10 weeks. Because the story also takes place over so many seasons, the filmmakers then returned to Sweden in mid-March, and also stopped off in London for two weeks to shoot scenes there, made a stop in Norway and then ended up in Sweden again.

Fascinating how this stuff gets made.

[via Coudal Partners]