Creativity

Bret Victor: Inventing on Principle

Bret Victor – Inventing on Principle from CUSEC on Vimeo.

Bret’s talk takes a while (53 minutes) but man is it worth it. Don’t be put off by the code (if you don’t code), it’s less about code, more about tight interactivity leading to more creativity as a guiding principle. When you couple excellent coding skills with a creative person who enjoys sharing many things are possible and this video is a demonstration of that.

Seymour Papert, various folks at the IBM Watson Research Lab, Bill Atkinson, Alan Kay, Larry Tesler, and others at Xerox PARC, and many other people have been working in this area but I have to say, Bret’s talk is the best I’ve heard (and I’ve heard many). He uses Tesler’s invention of modeless text editing as an example, among others.

Bret’s web site: Bret Victor

[via Kottke.org]

PressPausePlay

PressPausePlay from House of Radon on Vimeo.

The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent in an unprecedented way, with unlimited opportunities. But does democratized culture mean better art or is true talent instead drowned out? This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world’s most influential creators of the digital era.

This is an amazing film, really worth making the time (an hour and 21 minutes) to watch. It’s well thought out, well shot, well edited, and the message is nuanced, not a slam dunk for digital or against it.

[via PetaPixel]

Isang Litrong Liwanag (a Liter of Light)

I subscribe to the video feed from wimp.com and just saw this excellent video on an innovative project in the Philippines to bring a free source of light to poor people: Innovation at its finest.

The link in that video is this one (don’t bother writing it down, I’m giving it to you here): http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/

Watch the Reuters video at that site which goes into more detail on the project.

Isang Litrong Liwanag (A Liter of Light), is a sustainable lighting project which aims to bring the eco-friendly Solar Bottle Bulb to disprivileged communities nationwide. Designed and developed by students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Solar Bottle Bulb is based on the principles of Appropriate Technologies – a concept that provides simple and easily replicable technologies that address basic needs in developing communities.

Take a large, plastic soda or water bottle with top, fill it with water and a bit of bleach (to prevent mold over time), cut a hole in a corrugated roof and fit the bottle in with grout and you have a source of light that’s better than a skylight because the water diffuses the light and turns the bottom end of the bottle into a 60 watt light bulb.

This is pure genius.