Photography

The SCAR Project

The SCAR Project

Photographer David Jay is both an incredible portrait photographer and sensitive to the intimate psychological and physical details of breast cancer surgery. This is one of the most incredible collections of photographs I’ve seen on any subject. These images need to be seen printed as they’re large: exhibition schedule.

Check out the documentary: Baring It All.

The SCAR Project is a series of large-scale portraits of young breast cancer survivors shot by fashion photographer David Jay. Primarily an awareness raising campaign, The SCAR Project puts a raw, unflinching face on early onset breast cancer while paying tribute to the courage and spirit of so many brave young women.

Dedicated to the more than 10,000 women under the age of 40 who will be diagnosed this year alone, The SCAR Project is an exercise in awareness, hope, reflection and healing. The mission is three-fold: raise public consciousness of early-onset breast cancer, raise funds for breast cancer research/outreach programs and help young survivors see their scars, faces, figures and experiences through a new, honest and ultimately empowering lens.

[via Boing Boing]

Along the Pecoy Notch Trail in the Catskills

Kaaterskill High Peak from Dibble’s Quarry

Kaaterskill High Peak from Dibble’s Quarry
Along the Pecoy Notch Trail on the way to Pecoy Notch just east of Sugarloaf Mountain in the Catskills. Kaaterskill High Peak is on the skyline.

Dibble’s Quarry was mined for sidewalk slate used in New York City but over the years that it’s been part of a state park people have built a menagerie of cairns, chairs, tables, and fortresses out of the slate.

Beaver dam and pond below Pecoy Notch

Beaver dam and pond below Pecoy Notch
This beaver pond and dam sits next to the Pecoy Notch Trail. Behind the dam and pond you can see Pecoy Notch and Sugarloaf Mountain, one of the Catskills. The Devil’s Path runs along the skyline here, it’s a spectacular hike that Dave and I have done. Today we just went up to the notch using micro spikes.

This beaver pond is active and there are fresh tree stumps where the beavers have taken wood for the dam and for food.

Stream coming out of Pecoy Notch

Stream coming out of Pecoy Notch
This stream is part of the drainage from Twin and Sugarloaf Mountains and Pecoy Notch.

Ice on the Appalachian Trail

Ice on the AT

Mt. Race, Massachusetts. All of these shots were taken in a single puddle on the Appalachian Trail on the north ridge of Mt. Race. I don’t know enough about ice crystals to understand why some puddles produce crystals and others don’t but when I find a patch of great crystals like this it’s like finding gold. The only downside is that the gloves come off and one’s hands can get cold in a long session. The day I took these was relatively mild so hands didn’t suffer and as a result, more ice shots.

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Ice on the AT

Black birches from below

Black birch from below

On Mt. Greylock, Massachusetts. Hiking down the Haley Farm Trail on the west side of Mt. Greylock we came across a dead black birch with huge mushrooms on it. Hiked out to the tree and shot straight up hoping to catch the mushrooms but instead got an interesting shot of the creepy decaying tree and the trees around it.

Rail Bridge Replacement time lapse

Time Lapse – Rail Bridge Replacement, Cow Lane, Reading from Chris Wilkinson on Vimeo.

Upper Cut Productions was commissioned by BAM Nuttall and Network Rail to film a rail bridge reconstruction project in Reading, during the Christmas period of 2011.

3 weather-proofed time lapse cameras were installed in various locations to capture the progress of the new bridge construction – they took nearly 1/4million photographs over a 6 month period.

Following the short video of the bridge move between 24.12.11 and 28.12.11, this video reveals the full project from the bridge construction to the site clearance after New Year.

This is one of the best time lapse videos of anything I’ve ever seen. What an incredible construction job, building the bridge and moving it. And the fact that they used multiple cameras and wove the time lapse together so beautifully does justice to the amazing construction job. Wow.

[via wimp.com]

iPhone mute switch kerfuffle

Ringing Finally Ended, but There’s No Button to Stop Shame

The unmistakably jarring sound of an iPhone marimba ring interrupted the soft and spiritual final measures of Mahler’s Symphony No. 9 at the New York Philharmonic on Tuesday night. The conductor, Alan Gilbert, did something almost unheard-of in a concert hall: He stopped the performance. But the ringing kept on going, prompting increasingly angry shouts in the audience directed at the malefactor.

After words from Mr. Gilbert, and what seemed like weeks, the cellphone owner finally silenced his device. After the audience cheered, the concert resumed. Internet vitriol ensued.

Many people have been commenting on this event for a while now and Marco Arment pulls many of the various issues and sub-issues together here: Designing “Mute”.

No doubt how the mute switch works relative to all sounds is a meaningful design discussion but what interests me is that few if any of these discussions about the event recommend turning the phone off. Turning electronics off not only solves the unexpected alarm/ring problem, it also solves the problem of people silently texting their friends during a concert.

If I spend the money to go to a concert at Avery Fisher Hall the last thing I want is to be sitting next to someone with a lit up smartphone texting his or her friends.

The answer here is to turn off all electronic devices at a concert like this. Not sleep, not mute, but power down. That takes care of the texting problem and users who don’t know that they’ve set up an alarm to go off during a concert.