Beer

IPA and Piaget

IPA and Piaget

Santa Monica, California. No doubt this tall glass of IPA is all about the old Piagetian conservation idea that a given amount of liquid will remain constant no matter the shape of the container. The taller the glass, the more arrested development types like me will think we’re getting more than a typical glass of beer.

Piaget’s task included showing a child two beakers, one tall and thin, the other short and fat. The tall and thin would be empty; the short full. He would pour water from the short to the tall, asking the child if the quantity of water was the same. In accordance with Piaget’s ideas, the children replied ‘there is more’, because the appearance of the tall made it look as if it were bigger. This concluded that Piaget was correct, and the children did not have the ability to conserve. In his words, ‘children who are unable to conserve believe a perceptual change means a quantitative change.’

He furthered the conclusion to suggest that this confusion was born from a pre-operational child’s inability to understand the notion of reversibility; the ability to see the reversal of a physical transformation as well as the transformation itself. These ideas were used to create the ‘Principle of Invariance’.

On the other hand, even though I may be stuck in a stage that prevents me from seeing "reversibility," I have proven many a time in my younger years that if I drink enough beer I can most easily (and unpleasantly) reverse that beer drinking, moving the beer from a tall thin container (me) to a wide flat container (the floor) all the while knowing that the same amount of beer existed in both places.

Widmer Hefeweizen

Widmer HefeweizenOur Macworld group went to lunch and hey, people started ordering beer and the restaurant had one of my all-time fav beers: Widmer Hefeweizen, a Portland, Oregon micro-brew that we can’t get on tap back here in Connecticut, so what the heck.

I can see it now: Carlos will be world famous for shooting Vincent in shopping carts (continuing until Vincent is 24), Gary for shooting his dish rack daily for years, Mamen for the 1000 moods and faces of Aisha, and I’ll be infamous as the guy who shot beer, drank it, and then dropped his camera into the bay. I’ll receive a “less than Darwin Award” and maybe they’ll write a play (Lawnchair Larry).

Dim Sum with Tsingtao

Dim Sum with Tsingtao

Our Macworld group went out for lunch at the best dim sum restaurant I’ve ever been at (Mamen, help with name please) and I had a Tsingtao a bit earlier in the day than I generally drink beer.

All of the food and the people in our group were so photogenic and I was sitting at the head of the table so one would think… but, after emptying this bottle, the only thing I could think of to shoot was… the bottle.

Minneapolis bar shots

Black and tan

My friend Ketan said “I’ll have what he’s having” and ended up not liking the black and tan (he’s more of a Kingfisher guy) so this was for me after I finished mine.

As you can see by the focus of this image, it was not a good idea for me to help out here. No, I wasn’t driving.

Plates

Shot during a lull in the conversation, or, more accurately, while I gathered my composure after a second black and tan.

Dinner table shots

Wine bottle and blouseThis picture did not turn out quite the way I wanted. The woman sitting across from me at the restaurant had on a bright blouse and I thought the orange blur would look interesting behind the green wine bottle. Problem was that I lost track of focus and and with an apeture of 1.4 only the shoulder of the wine bottle is close to focused (even that’s off a bit I think). No, I did not empty the wine bottle, I don’t drink wine… I’m a beer drinker…

Beer glass, empty…and on to beer drinking.

I was trying for Guiness rings without the Guiness. Not bad for a Yank me thinks.

Here’s a tip: bring your camera to all dinner parties. When the conversation gets boring or weird or folks start speaking a language you do not know, shoot away.

Dinner tables are full of great subject matter not to mention candid shots of the dinner guests.